My Site Has Moved

5 12 2015

My website moved

Please join me on my new website: pamlibrarian.com

Pam Harland Learning Commons Librarian





Top 5 Things I Saw at #ALAMW15

9 02 2015

ALA Midwinter 2015 Share-Outalamw15 banner

Top 5 Things I Saw at #ALAMW15

5. Watching hundreds of librarians freaking out over book awards: What a sight to be seen! If you get the chance, go to the ALA Youth Media Awards.

IMG_1642

4. Chicago is fun: amazing architecture, friendly people, and beautiful art.

sunnychicago

3. But when it snows… it snows!! We had over a foot of cold blowing snow!

snowychicago

2. Meeting up with librarians from all over the country is one of the best parts of ALA! Sabrina Carnesi, Pam Renfrow, Marlene Woo-Lun, Dorcas Hand, Hilda Weisburg, and so many others!

The librarians from Region 1 are smart, funny, and filled with great ideas! It was great to spend time with Susan Ballard, Jessica Gilcreast, Amy Short, Kathy Lowe, Judi Paradis, and Anita Cellucci.

1. School Librarians Transform Learning! At the AASL Affiliates Assembly planning session, we were given buttons that said “Ask Me How School Librarians Transform Learning” and business cards with several elevator speech ideas. We will be handing out copies of the business cards at the NHSLMA Conference in May!

IMG_1605 http://www.ala.org/aasl/sites/ala.org.aasl/files/content/aaslissues/advocacy/AASL_Infographic_FINAL.pdf





Just-in-Time Research Skills

25 11 2014
collaborationI find the best method for teaching research skills to students is via collaboration with your faculty.
I believe students learn best when given “just-in-time” research skills instruction, not “just-in-case” instruction.
For instance:
  • Teach them to use your health database when they come in for health research.
  • Teach them to evaluate websites as a formative assignment with your World Cultures teachers.
  • Show them how to cite as they write as soon as they begin collecting resources by showing them how to use the EasyBib add-on in Google Docs.
I use a short “Content Area Research Rubric” that I share with my content area faculty (not the English teachers, but everyone else uses it). I also have a Research LibGuide set up that everyone uses: http://srhs.sau17.libguides.com/research (my rubrics are there, too.) I try to make sure that all parts of the research process are covered by a variety of classes and that students hear a consistent message coming from across the disciplines.collaboration
I occasionally remind all of our faculty (through staff meeting presentations, PLC collaboration, or one-on-one discussions) about the Common Core Anchor Standards that address Research literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects:
Research to Build and Present Knowledge:
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.CCRA.W.9-12.
Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects to answer a question (including a self-generated question) or solve a problem; narrow or broaden the inquiry when appropriate; synthesize multiple sources on the subject, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.CCRA.W.9-12
Gather relevant information from multiple authoritative print and digital sources, using advanced searches effectively; assess the usefulness of each source in answering the research question; integrate information into the text selectively to maintain the flow of ideas, avoiding plagiarism and following a standard format for citation.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.CCRA.W.9
Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.




Killer Library Reports

8 07 2014

Nobody wants to read boring statistics about your library at the end of the year. Find a way to show your stakeholders what you’ve really accomplished with a colorful, data-driven library report.

I’ve recently changed my library report to an infographic. I think it’s important to use graphics, color, and even pictures of happy students using your library space and resources. I try to do reports monthly, but they usually come out quarterly.

SRHSstats14

 

I asked several colleagues to share their reports with me.

Jessica Gilcreast shares her beautiful Infographic-style library report here:

Rachel Hopkins uses LibGuides to make her report creative and easy to browse:

The brilliant Sue Kowalski (@spkowalski) also used LibGuides for her Library Report. I especially like the headings for each section like: “Culture of Thinking and Learning” and “Enjoyment and Engagement.” I’m definitely going to take some of those headings and incorporate them into my future reports.

 

I got a tweet this week from Mary Morgan Ryan (@mmorganryan). She made her library report using a tool called smore. Check out her beautiful report:

How do you share statistics and information about your library with your stakeholders?